Solzhenitsyn and the result of yesterday’s plebiscite

From the foreword to Alexander Solzhenitsyn’s Harvard commencement address of June 8, 1978:

Harvard’s motto is “Veritas.” Many of you have already found out and others will find out in the course of their lives that truth eludes us if we do not concentrate with total attention on its pursuit. And even while it eludes us, the illusion still lingers of knowing it and leads to many misunderstandings. Also, truth is seldom pleasant; it is almost invariably bitter. There is some bitterness in my speech today, too. But I want to stress that it comes not from an adversary but from a friend.

Here, Solzhenitsyn voices his misgivings about embracing the West as an alternative to Soviet Communism:

It is almost universally recognized that the West shows all the world a way to successful economic development, even though in the past years it has been strongly disturbed by chaotic inflation. However, many people living in the West are dissatisfied with their own society. They despise it or accuse it of not being up to the level of maturity attained by mankind. A number of such critics turn to socialism, which is a false and dangerous current.

[snip]

But should someone ask me whether I would indicate the West such as it is today as a model to my country, frankly I would have to answer negatively. No, I could not recommend your society in its present state as an ideal for the transformation of ours. Through intense suffering our country has now achieved a spiritual development of such intensity that the Western system in its present state of spiritual exhaustion does not look attractive.

This is in no small measure a result of the West’s abandonment of self-restraint:

However, in early democracies, as in American democracy at the time of its birth, all individual human rights were granted because man is God’s creature. That is, freedom was given to the individual conditionally, in the assumption of his constant religious responsibility. Such was the heritage of the preceding thousand years. Two hundred or even fifty years ago, it would have seemed quite impossible, in America, that an individual could be granted boundless freedom simply for the satisfaction of his instincts or whims. Subsequently, however, all such limitations were discarded everywhere in the West; a total liberation occurred from the moral heritage of Christian centuries with their great reserves of mercy and sacrifice. State systems were becoming increasingly and totally materialistic. The West ended up by truly enforcing human rights, sometimes even excessively, but man’s sense of responsibility to God and society grew dimmer and dimmer. In the past decades, the legalistically selfish aspect of Western approach and thinking has reached its final dimension and the world wound up in a harsh spiritual crisis and a political impasse. All the glorified technological achievements of Progress, including the conquest of outer space, do not redeem the Twentieth century’s moral poverty which no one could imagine even as late as in the Nineteenth Century.

In my previous post, Mr. Beran asserts that..

At the same time, conservatives ought to recognize that our deeper problems … are cultural, not political, and are therefore not susceptible of a political solution.

However, Solzhenitsyn sees our “deeper problems” as resulting from the “Twentieth century’s moral poverty” which is, I believe, closer to “Veritas” than calling our current travails cultural issues. And as everyone knows, you can’t legislate morality.

But we should have paid more attention to Alexander’s voice crying out from within the wilderness.

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One Response to Solzhenitsyn and the result of yesterday’s plebiscite

  1. Many should have paid more attention to Solzhenitsyn’s speech and other writings.

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